HOME THEATER NETWORK
Home Theater Network
Video Connections
HDMI
HDMI
DVI
DVI
Component
COMPONENT
VGA
VGA
SCART
SCART
BNC
BNC
S-Video
S-VIDEO
Composite
COMPOSITE
RF Coax
COAXIAL

BNC

BNC BNC In

BNC is the most modular of all the video interconnects. It can carry high definition or standard definition video depending on the signal being passed through it. A BNC interconnect is almost always found using a coax cable, which means it can only carry a single signal. It is common to see RGB, component, S–Video, and composite video signals using BNC interconnects.

Click here for more information on BNC’s audio capabilities.
Click here for more information on BNC’s data capabilities.


Coaxial (F-Connector, RF coax)

RF Coax RF Coax In

The cables provided by your local cable company, and located in almost every house are terminated by a coaxial interconnect. Hundreds of channels, VOIP phone service, and a high speed internet connection can all be distributed through a single coax cable. This is how your local cable company distributes data to your house. However, a tuner or modem is necessary to decode all this data. A cable box includes a tuner to decipher the data, which can then transmit high definition video via its HDMI, DVI, or component interconnect. A VCR, for example, does not include a tuner, and would send a very low quality video and audio signal to a TV if it was using a coaxial interconnect.

A coaxial interconnect can be useful when connecting to a cable box or a cable modem. However, it provides low quality video and sound when connecting between devices without tuners. Video quality is limited to 300 lines of resolution, and sound quality is limited to mono.

Click here for more information on coaxial’s audio capabilities.



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